Based on multiple clinical studies over the past twenty years, including work performed by the National Eye Institute, the accurate measurement of tear lactoferrin has been determined to be the only available diagnostic biomarker judged accurate enough to be considered a confirmatory test for tear (aqueous) deficiency. As such, it has long been accepted as the medical standard for assessing the secretory function of the lacrimal gland.

Dry Eye Syndrome can have multiple confusing and over-lapping etiologies, but essentially fall into two main categories: Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye (ADDE) and Evaporative Dry Eye (EDE).

ATD’s lactoferrin test, importantly, provides the clinician the ability to accurately confirm Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye and assist in differentiation between ADDE and EDE.

As a quantitative test, it also allows the clinician the ability to precisely grade the level of severity as well as monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

Low tear lactoferrin correlates with a diminishment in the secretory (aqueous output) function of the Lacrimal Gland thus is considered a confirmatory test for Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye.